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Lemon Law Woman

Where Do Lemon Cars Go?: Interesting NY Times Story on Laundered Lemons

September 01, 2007 By: LemonLaw Category: Car Lemon Law, Defective Car, Kimmel & Silverman, lemon buybacks, Pennsylvania Lemon Law, used cars, Vehicle Fraud

Ever wonder what happens to lemon cars once they are bought back by the manufacturer? Last Sunday, The New York Times printed an interesting story which should shed some light on this mystery.

Many Pennsylvania consumers are unaware that, in 2002, K&S Attorney Craig Thor Kimmel worked with the Pennsylvania House of Representatives Consumer Affairs Committee to amend the Lemon Law to include tighter title provisions for used cars.  Here’s the press release from our news room:

PA Lemon Law TAKES EFFECT TODAY

New Pennsylvania Lemon Law Will Require Dealers, Lessors, and Transferors To Disclose If Used Car Has Lemon History

Harrisburg, PA (December 2,2002) – A new change to the Pennsylvania Lemon Law to help used car consumers takes place today. House Bill 767, a measure to protect used car buyers from purchasing lemon buybacks without full disclosure, was signed by Governor Mark Schweiker in October and goes into effect today.

The change marks the second major amendment to the Pennsylvania Lemon Law Statute in the past year; the first being the expansion of the Law to include leased cars. Pennsylvania is the first state to take this type of action.

Read the full press release on PA House Bill 767.


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6 Responses to “Where Do Lemon Cars Go?: Interesting NY Times Story on Laundered Lemons”


  1. #1 Lisa Cutler says:

    I suspect that I have recently purchased a lemonlaw byback in Canada. I believe this car was bought at an auction in the states by a canadian dealer who has now sold this car to me.

    Right now the car is in a Volkswagen dealership (did not purchase car here) getting fixed / inspected.

    What should I do?

    • #2 LemonLaw says:

      I would run a carfax report at http://www.carfax.com. I am not sure if they offer their service in Canada. If you resided in the States, you would have been required to sign a disclosure form stating the car was a buyback, and if you didn’t, that would be grounds for a lawsuit.

      • #3 adgheh3 says:

        I would run a carfax report at http://www.carfax.com. I am not sure if they offer their service in Canada. If you resided in the States, you would have been required to sign a disclosure form stating the car was a buyback, and if you didn’t, that would be grounds for a lawsuit.

        • #4 Susan Smith says:

          I purchased a 2007 BMW X3 that had been a lemon but sent back to the factory and supposedly fixed. I have had it since 5000 miles. Now I wish to sell it and buy a new one. How do I go about doing this and finding out true value since once subject to lemon law? I have always had repaired at BMW. Never had any problems. Car is in excellent condition, but went to trade in and they will not trade. Do certain dealerships purchase these kinds of automobiles. Won’t do that again because of this, but have had no problems whatsoever. Good clean service record. No accidents.

          • #5 LemonLaw says:

            Susan: If you do not disclose the history when selling or trading the car, you run the risk of being sued. The value of the car will be significantly less than the Kelly Blue Book value for a non-buyback.

            • #6 Ex Used Car Lot Porter says:

              I suspect that those buyback lemon cars will simply be shipped out to other states with slack lemon and rebuilt title car laws. Used car businesses use every dirty trick ever devised to sell cars at the absolute highest profit possible without ever putting a dime into the cars. The owner of the car lot that I worked at also owned a junkyard so that’s where any needed parts came from, also I drove a large van around town to pick up used tires from tire dealers & big box stores. Reconditioned car batteries were purchased in lots for the used cars and were only good as long as the weather stayed warm. We would detail the cars and change the oil & filter and maybe the antifreeze but very little else, car dealers are as bad as banks and even our own government, greedy, rotten to the core and could care less. Sorry to sound harsh but that’s the awful truth. Shop with care and never buy any used used car without a mechanic checking it out and a carfax for the cars history. Shop with care & beware.


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